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June Book Display

LGBTQIA+ Pride Month

Pride Flags

Gilbert Baker Flag

Gilbert Baker Pride Flag

 In 1977, Harvey Milk challenged Gilbert Baker, a veteran who taught himself to sew, to come up with a symbol of pride for the gay community. His response? The original Pride flag. Inspired by Judy Garland's "Over the Rainbow," these colors flew at the San Francisco Gay Freedom Day Parade celebration on June 25, 1978.  

Gilbert Baker  (Vector graphics by Fibonacci), Public domain, via Wikimedia Commons

Philadelphia People of Color-Inclusive Flag

Philadelphia People of Color-Inclusive Flag

Noting that queer people of color are often not fully included in the LGBT community, the city of Philadelphia added two colors — black and brown — to the Pride flag in their honor.

Philadelphia City Council and Tierney, Public domain, via Wikimedia Commons

Progress Pride Flag

Progress Pride Flag

This new flag seeks to take Philadelphia's inclusive approach a step further. Daniel Quasar, who identifies as queer and nonbinary, designed this flag. The white, pink, and light blue reflect the colors of the transgender flag, while the brown and black stripes represent people of color and those lost to AIDS.

Paul2520, Public domain, via Wikimedia Commons

Bisexual Flag

Bisexual Flag

Designed by Michael Page, the flag brings visibility to the bisexual community, showing the overlap of the stereotypical colors for boys and girls.

 

Michael Page, Public domain, via Wikimedia Commons

Pansexual Flag

Pansexual Flag

Created on the web in 2010, this flag has colors that represent pansexuality's interest in all genders as partners.

 

Jasper, Public domain, via Wikimedia Commons

Asexual Flag

Asexual Flag

Like the pansexual flag, the asexual flag was created in 2010.

 

AnonMoos (SVG file); AVEN (flag design), Public domain, via Wikimedia Commons

Transgender Flag

Transgender Flag

Monica Helms, a trans woman, designed this flag in 1999, and it was first flown at a Pride Parade in Phoenix a year later.

 

SVG file Dlloyd based on Monica Helms design, Public domain, via Wikimedia Commons

Genderfluid/Genderflexible Flag

Genderfluid/Genderflexible Flag

Encompassing the fluctuations and the flexibility of gender in genderfluid people, the flag features colors associated with femininity, masculinity, and everything in between.

 

JJ Pole.McLennonSonGarethPW, CC BY-SA 4.0 <https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0>, via Wikimedia Commons

Genderqueer Flag

Genderqueer Flag

Created in 2011 by Marilyn Roxie, the genderqueer flag highlights androgyny with lavender, agender identities with white, and nonbinary people with green. 

 

Marilyn Roxie, McLennonSon, Public domain, via Wikimedia Commons

Lesbian Flag

Lesbian Flag

A new lesbian flag with seven horizontal stripes was introduced on social media in 2018, with the dark orange stripe representing gender non-conformity, the orange stripe representing independence, the light orange stripe representing community, the white stripe representing unique relationships to womanhood, the pink stripe representing serenity and peace, the dusty pink stripe representing love and sex, and the dark rose stripe representing femininity.

SVG file by L ke in Inkscape, CC0, via Wikimedia Commons

Polysexuality Pride Flag

Polysexual Flag

Polysexuality, unlike pansexuality, is the attraction to multiple genders but not all. A middle ground between bisexuality and pansexuality, it is centered more around attractions to femininity and masculinity rather than gender itself.

 

McLennonSon, CC BY-SA 4.0 <https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0>, via Wikimedia Commons

Agender Flag

Agender Flag

While genderqueer people bend the rules of gender, agender people reject a gender completely. For their flag, the black and white stripes represent the absence of gender, while green, the inverse of the gender-heavy purple, represents nonbinary genders.

 

Tumblr user: transrants, Public domain, via Wikimedia Commons

Nonbinary Flag

Nonbinary Flag

Created by 17-year-old Kye Rowan in 2014, this flag was a response to nonbinary people feeling improperly represented by the genderqueer flag.

 

Kye Rowan, CC0, via Wikimedia Commons

Intersex Flag

Intersex Flag

Intersex International Australia designed this flag in 2013 with non-gendered colors "that celebrate living outside the binary." Intersex (variation in sex characteristics) is also represented in the transgender flag.

 

Intersex International Australia, via Wikimedia Commons

Two Spirit Pride Flag

The Two-Spirit Pride Flag represents queer Native American individuals as an umbrella term, including traditional and cultural context. Per the University of Northern Colorado, "Two-spirit individuals traditionally were viewed as holding a masculine and feminine spirit. They held a gender identity outside of the binary man or woman." The flag's creation is attributed to Myra Laramee (Cree).

 

Myra Laramee, via Wikimedia Commons